Tuesday, September 19, 2017
History of jujitsu

 Brazilian Jujitsu, which is often simply referred to as BJJ, is one of the most common grappling arts for mixed martial artists to train in. It is a fantastic system of submission fighting that has evolved along side the sport of MMA since its inception. While you do see many MMA fighters who have a background in other forms of submission fighting, such as Judo or Sambo, Brazilian Jujitsu is arguably the most often used base for the submission techniques used by fighters.


The Histoy of Jiu jitsu





It is well known that martial arts and fighting has been prevalent in Japan for many, many years. In fact, some of the earliest records that Japan has, such as the Record of Ancient Matters (also known as the Kojiki) and the Chronicles of Japan (known as the Nihon Shoki), give details about early styles of martial arts and combat. Stories have been told of Jiu Jitsu’s origins, however, the most famous story includes two warriors who fought in front of Emperor Sunin – Tajima no Kehaya was defeated and killed by the warrior Nomi no Sekuni of Izumo. The fighting style used during this epic battle became known as Nihon Koryu jujutsu and included a series of kicks, punches, throws and other forms of unarmed combat.



Nihon jujutsu began to take several forms, including Edo jujutsu, and the techniques used in both styles of martial arts evolved into a form similar to modern Jiu Jitsu today. Many techniques that could be seen in both Edo jujutsu and Nihon jujutsu included throws (such as joint-locking throws and throws that unbalance the opponent), kicks, punches, and controlling the opponent using a variety of tactics including strangulation, wrestling and pinning. Jiu Jitsu also evolved to include a variety of defense mechanisms, such as blocking, escaping a fight if needed and evading an opponent’s attacks.



As time went on and the martial art of Jiu Jitsu developed, students of the art were taught to use various weapons. Many weapons were used, including small iron fans and daggers (these were also used in the earlier version of Edo jujutsu), however, the weapon most unique to jiu jitsu is the hojo waza, or the hojo cord. As its namesake implies, the hojo cord is a thin, small cord that is used to restrain or strangle an opponent if needed. Of course, since this technique can be brutal and sometimes the end result is fatal, the more modern versions of Jiu Jitsu do not include training a student to use a hojo cord. However, police in Japan are, in fact, still trained to use a hojo cord (along with handcuffs) should the need to use it ever arise.



As time went on and the martial art of Jiu Jitsu developed, students of the art were taught to use various weapons. Many weapons were used, including small iron fans and daggers (these were also used in the earlier version of Edo jujutsu), however, the weapon most unique to jiu jitsu is the hojo waza, or the hojo cord. As its namesake implies, the hojo cord is a thin, small cord that is used to restrain or strangle an opponent if needed. Of course, since this technique can be brutal and sometimes the end result is fatal, the more modern versions of Jiu Jitsu do not include training a student to use a hojo cord. However, police in Japan are, in fact, still trained to use a hojo cord (along with handcuffs) should the need to use it ever arise.



Police in Tokyo and other parts of Japan also utilize their own form of Jiu Jitsu, called Gendai jujutsu. The popularity of this form of Jiu Jitsu spread quickly, however, and many in many countries, this form of martial art is utilized by police forces across the globe. Because of its versatility, Jiu Jitsu (modern and older styles) can be used as a basis for other martial arts to build off of.

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